The initial burst of very rapid, double-digit growth in the US craft beer industry has in recent years been settling out at around 4-6% growth per year, with a similar figure projected for 2019. The industry is maturing, with brewers refining their business models. This process will inevitably see some breweries with less sustainable models falling by the wayside, but a lot more breweries are opening than closing. Both conferences we attended were a hive of activity, with a great deal of innovation on show. Everyone agrees beer quality is getting better and better, and that comes with experience.

IPA’s remain the number one craft beer type and have grown to represent 40% of the US craft beer market as per the most recent scan data

out of retail stores; this type is becoming heavily diversified and encompassing a wide range of different styles, united by their hop-hungriness which is driving aromatic hop innovation. IPAs traditionally struggle with retaining their hop profiles and are driving many of the visiting brewers to trial Brewshield.

Still waiting to come to fruition in terms of volume but often mooted as the next big movers are lagers and pilsners. These craft lagers are hoppier than their standard counterparts, often brewed using more traditional – or ‘noble’ – aromatic hops that provide a subtler hop aroma than those that go into, say, an IPA. Again a focus on Brewshield to assist in aroma and flavor preservation.

The initial burst of very rapid, double-digit growth in the US craft beer industry has in recent years been settling out at around 4-6% growth per year, with a similar figure projected for 2019. The industry is maturing, with brewers refining their business models. This process will inevitably see some breweries with less sustainable models falling by the wayside, but a lot more breweries are opening than closing. Both conferences we attended were a hive of activity, with a great deal of innovation on show. Everyone agrees beer quality is getting better and better, and that comes with experience.

IPA’s remain the number one craft beer type and have grown to represent 40% of the US craft beer market as per the most recent scan data

out of retail stores; this type is becoming heavily diversified and encompassing a wide range of different styles, united by their hop-hungriness which is driving aromatic hop innovation. IPAs traditionally struggle with retaining their hop profiles and are driving many of the visiting brewers to trial Brewshield.

Still waiting to come to fruition in terms of volume but often mooted as the next big movers are lagers and pilsners. These craft lagers are hoppier than their standard counterparts, often brewed using more traditional – or ‘noble’ – aromatic hops that provide a subtler hop aroma than those that go into, say, an IPA. Again a focus on Brewshield to assist in aroma and flavor preservation.